Spot In The White Part Of Eye

What are those floaty things in your eye Michael Mauser

Have you ever noticed something swimmingin your field of visioné It may look like a tiny wormor a transparent blob, and whenever you try to geta closer look, it disappears, only to reappearas soon as you shift your glance. But don't go rinsing out your eyes! What you are seeing is a common phenomenon known as a floater. The scientific name for these objectsis Muscae volitantes,

Latin for quot;flying flies,quot; and true to their name,they can be somewhat annoying. But they're not actually bugsor any kind of external objects at all. Rather, they exist inside your eyeball. Floaters may seem to be alive,since they move and change shape, but they are not alive. Floaters are tiny objectsthat cast shadows on the retina, the lightsensitive tissueat the back of your eye.

They might be bits of tissue, red blood cells, or clumps of protein. And because they're suspendedwithin the vitreous humor, the gellike liquidthat fills the inside of your eye, floaters drift alongwith your eye movements, and seem to bounce a littlewhen your eye stops. Floaters may be onlybarely distinguishable most of the time.

They become more visiblethe closer they are to the retina, just as holding your hand closerto a table with an overhead light will result in a moresharply defined shadow. And floaters are particularly noticeable when you are lookingat a uniform bright surface, like a blank computer screen, snow, or a clear sky,

where the consistency of the backgroundmakes them easier to distinguish. The brighter the light is,the more your pupil contracts. This has an effect similarto replacing a large diffuse light fixture with a single overhead light bulb, which also makesthe shadow appear clearer. There is another visual phenomenonthat looks similar to floaters but is in fact unrelated. If you've seen tiny dots of lightdarting about

when looking at a bright blue sky, you've experienced what is knownas the blue field entoptic phenomenon. In some ways,this is the opposite of seeing floaters. Here, you are not seeing shadows but little moving windowsletting light through to your retina. The windows are actually causedby white blood cells moving through the capillariesalong your retina's surface. These leukocytes can be so largethat they nearly fill a capillary

Multiple milia under the eyes

So you're gonna hear this little buzz Well, you're not really gonna hear a noise, but you're gonna feel one little pinch here. I'm gonna do one, okayé Just one. I'll do this one right here. You can feel me touch you right there. Okay. Readyé You okayé Mhmm.

I'll do it a couple times right there. Gonna do it again. A tiny one. You okayé She's tough. Good. These are milia she's got on her eye. I don't know why you have so many of them here. (Background: What. what causes theseé)

Y'know, they're. (Background:Fatty foodé) No, no. You okayé If you need a break, just raise your hand, okayé I think she just It's probably It might even be products you put on your face.

Something that Okay, okay. We're gonna pay attention to her and not talk to anybody else. We're just gonna put a little pressure with that little instrument you've seen me use before. We're gonna push that one out. The ones right under your eye are gonna be Are not easy, because there there's no bone to push against.

You know what I meané So we kind of let the cautery let them shell out. Help them to shell out. You alrighté Mhmm. Actually, some of the bigger ones are doing alright with me knicking them. (Background: She's gonna look prettiness when she's all done.)

She is pretty! I know. She is pretty, though. (Background: Thank you.) A I make everybody cry. Well, not everybody but. I don't like to make her cry. Here.

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