I See A Spot In One Eye

What are those floaty things in your eye Michael Mauser

Have you ever noticed something swimmingin your field of visioné It may look like a tiny wormor a transparent blob, and whenever you try to geta closer look, it disappears, only to reappearas soon as you shift your glance. But don't go rinsing out your eyes! What you are seeing is a common phenomenon known as a floater. The scientific name for these objectsis Muscae volitantes,

Latin for quot;flying flies,quot; and true to their name,they can be somewhat annoying. But they're not actually bugsor any kind of external objects at all. Rather, they exist inside your eyeball. Floaters may seem to be alive,since they move and change shape, but they are not alive. Floaters are tiny objectsthat cast shadows on the retina, the lightsensitive tissueat the back of your eye.

They might be bits of tissue, red blood cells, or clumps of protein. And because they're suspendedwithin the vitreous humor, the gellike liquidthat fills the inside of your eye, floaters drift alongwith your eye movements, and seem to bounce a littlewhen your eye stops. Floaters may be onlybarely distinguishable most of the time.

They become more visiblethe closer they are to the retina, just as holding your hand closerto a table with an overhead light will result in a moresharply defined shadow. And floaters are particularly noticeable when you are lookingat a uniform bright surface, like a blank computer screen, snow, or a clear sky,

where the consistency of the backgroundmakes them easier to distinguish. The brighter the light is,the more your pupil contracts. This has an effect similarto replacing a large diffuse light fixture with a single overhead light bulb, which also makesthe shadow appear clearer. There is another visual phenomenonthat looks similar to floaters but is in fact unrelated. If you've seen tiny dots of lightdarting about

when looking at a bright blue sky, you've experienced what is knownas the blue field entoptic phenomenon. In some ways,this is the opposite of seeing floaters. Here, you are not seeing shadows but little moving windowsletting light through to your retina. The windows are actually causedby white blood cells moving through the capillariesalong your retina's surface. These leukocytes can be so largethat they nearly fill a capillary

Why Do People Have Blind Spots

This episode was proudly made possible bythe allnew 2015 Subaru Legacy. It's not just a sedan, it's a Subaru. Can you see everything on the screen withoutmoving your eyesé Look at me did you see thaté Didn't think so.a Howdy lookers, thanks for tuning into DNews,I'm Trace. Eyes are little 1 inch diameter balls (2.54 cm) tucked in your head, and thoughthey're magnificent, human eyes aren't even CLOSE to the best in the animal kingdom. Infact, your brain is tricking you into thinking your eye is seeing things that aren't thereRIGHT NOW. We've all got blind spots that

we can't see, and huge sections of our visionare just… wrong! Take a piece of paper with a dot and a pluson it. Close one eye, hold the paper close to your face and look straight at the dot,pulling it away slowly. Eventually, the plus should disappear! That's your blind spot.If you switch eyes, the dot should disappear. You might have to try it a couple of times.To understand WHY this happens, we have to go inside the eye. If you could fly into the pupil and insidethe eyeball to look around you'd be floating in vitreous humor of the inner eye. It's aclear, gellike material. On the walls of

the eye, you'd see blood vessels streamingeverywhere, and spread across the back of the eye you'd see the rod and cone cells ofthe retina. Rods are for low light, cones are for color and visual detail. If you got closer to the retina, you couldspot the macula right in the middle with only cone cells that's the only part of yourvision that you can see clearly. If you look at my face here, you can see it clearly, butwhile still looking at my face pay attention to the walls around me, or my shirt. It'sVERY difficult to comprehend the rest of your visual field. The macula is truly the onlypoint of visual clarity!

From there, you could follow the nerves ofthe retina, like following a bunch of extension cords to the wall. Eventually, you'd get tothe optic disk; a part of the eye with no rods or cones. That's where the optic nerveenters the eyeball! It's kind of like where your eye plugs in. And it causes a blind spot.There's nothing there for your eye to perceive since there are no rod or cone cells! My eye was nice enough to send me apicture of the inside of my own eye. You can see the macula here, and the optic nerve here.That is my point of clarity, and my blind spot!

If it seems stupid to have a blind spot, you'reright. Cephalapods don't have one, because their optic nerves run BEHIND the retina ratherthan in front of it. Think of it this way, cephalopods have their wiring inside the walls,but because of an unfortunate evolutionary mutation, mammals didn't and thus we all haveblind spots. The reason you don't see this spot all thetime is because your brain fills it in. Try doing the dot and plus experiment with a pieceof colorful paper and your brain will fill it in with color. That's your brain trickingyou into thinking your vision is perfect, when it's really not. Silly brain, tricksare for nonscientists.

Blind spots are very important to be awareof especially when you're driving! That's why we wanna thank Subaru for making thisepisode possible. And especially the allnew 2015 Subaru Legacy. Every sedan has its benefits,but only one combines them all. It's not just a sedan. It's a Subaru. If you could have the eyes of another animal,which would it beé Catsé Eaglesé Cephalopodsé Mantis Shrimpé!We're watching for your comments, so leave one. Thanks for watching DNews. Here's lookingat you, kid. Please subscribe.

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