Flashes Of White Light In Eye

Why We See The White Light Near Death

There are probably few experiences you couldhave that would confuse your brain more than almost dying. Hey friends, Laci Green here for DNews. quot;Neardeath experiencesquot; have been described by people across the world who cameor thoughtthey were comingwithin an inch of their life. What's totally crazy is that no matterwho you are, where you come fromeveryone describes it very similarly. It starts witha warmth spreading throughout their body, absolute serenity and calm, some might evencall it nirvana. Then comes a bright light and a feeling of being detached from the body,as if you were floating.

The number of people who have a near deathexperiences is on the rise, thanks to technologies that can save people at the last moment. Naturally,there's a burning question: WHAT DOES IT ALL MEAN!éé This is a complicated and emotionally chargedquestion. For some, the near death experience is proof of the afterlife. For others, it'sa fascinating neurological question. Let's take a look at this phenomenon through a scientificlens. One of the most highly regarded studies onNDEs comes from the University of Kentucky. They found that some Near Death Experiencesmay actually be something called REM intrusion.

During REM intrusion, the mind awakes beforethe body, which can trigger hallucinations. It's sort of like dreaming while you'reawake, kind of. I covered this phenomenon in my tutorial about sleep paralysis, so if you'reinterested you should definitely check that out cause it's freaky stuff. Because REM intrusion happens in the brainstem,it's possible for this to occur even when higher functioning parts of the brain havegone dead. Building on this research, trauma to the braincan result in a sensory mixup. As your brain struggles to stay alive, all of that chaosresults in an information overload in the

visual cortex. This is known to produce visionsof a bright light or a dark tunnel. The brain also releases a flood of happy endorphinswhich put you in a profound state of peace and calm. And because your brain is responsiblefor orienting your body relative to everything around you, trauma and oxygen deprivationcan cause a sort of out of body experience. This has been observed in lots of people whoaren't having a near death experience as well. Lastly, a new study has been published bythe Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on NDEs. The study was done on rats and found thatafter cardiac arrest, there is a crazy spike

in neural activity. The lead author says thatquot;if anything, the brain is much more active during the dying process than even the wakingstatequot;. Essentially, the neurons go into overdrive as death sets in, causing the brain to gohaywire in a predictable way cue warmth, bright light, floating, etc. We perceive thisexperience with profound intensity as our brain takes a last hurrah before death. I can't decide if this is beautiful or terrifyingor depressing or what. Let me know your thoughts about near death experiences down below oron our facebook page and I'll see you next time here on DNews!

What are those floaty things in your eye Michael Mauser

Have you ever noticed something swimmingin your field of visioné It may look like a tiny wormor a transparent blob, and whenever you try to geta closer look, it disappears, only to reappearas soon as you shift your glance. But don't go rinsing out your eyes! What you are seeing is a common phenomenon known as a floater. The scientific name for these objectsis Muscae volitantes,

Latin for quot;flying flies,quot; and true to their name,they can be somewhat annoying. But they're not actually bugsor any kind of external objects at all. Rather, they exist inside your eyeball. Floaters may seem to be alive,since they move and change shape, but they are not alive. Floaters are tiny objectsthat cast shadows on the retina, the lightsensitive tissueat the back of your eye.

They might be bits of tissue, red blood cells, or clumps of protein. And because they're suspendedwithin the vitreous humor, the gellike liquidthat fills the inside of your eye, floaters drift alongwith your eye movements, and seem to bounce a littlewhen your eye stops. Floaters may be onlybarely distinguishable most of the time.

They become more visiblethe closer they are to the retina, just as holding your hand closerto a table with an overhead light will result in a moresharply defined shadow. And floaters are particularly noticeable when you are lookingat a uniform bright surface, like a blank computer screen, snow, or a clear sky,

where the consistency of the backgroundmakes them easier to distinguish. The brighter the light is,the more your pupil contracts. This has an effect similarto replacing a large diffuse light fixture with a single overhead light bulb, which also makesthe shadow appear clearer. There is another visual phenomenonthat looks similar to floaters but is in fact unrelated. If you've seen tiny dots of lightdarting about

when looking at a bright blue sky, you've experienced what is knownas the blue field entoptic phenomenon. In some ways,this is the opposite of seeing floaters. Here, you are not seeing shadows but little moving windowsletting light through to your retina. The windows are actually causedby white blood cells moving through the capillariesalong your retina's surface. These leukocytes can be so largethat they nearly fill a capillary

Leave a Reply