Eye Spot Pregnancy

Light Spotting During Pregnancy

Many women cannot help but feel nervous duringpregnancy, especially during those early months. Symptoms they would not blink an eye at duringordinary circumstances can become absolutely terrifying. One symptom many women worry about in particularis light spotting during pregnancy. If you experience this symptom, it's likelythat you don't need to be concerned. It's a very common symptom, and most of thewomen who experience it do not have any problems. If you call your about it, it's likelythat they'll say the exact same thing. If you're still concerned about the spotting,try to lie down, relax, and drink some water.

The best thing you can do is to take careof yourself and keep yourself hydrated. This will help both you and your baby. You should be concerned if the spotting becomesheavier. You should also be worried if the spottinghas an unusual smell, or if you experience additional symptoms along with it, such asitching. This can be a sign of a yeast infection, whichis very common during pregnancy. If the spotting is light and doesn't persist,it's likely that you do not have anything to worry about.

All you have to do is continue taking careof yourself like you would normally. Try to minimize anxiety if possible; it isnot good for the baby. If you feel nervous about your light spottingduring pregnancy, go ahead and give your 's office a call. They'll be able to tell you whether or notit's cause for concern. In most cases, spotting isn't a sign of anythingin particular. It's just something that happens to women, particularly when they're pregnant. Light spotting on its own is not a problem;it's only when it's accompanied by other symptoms

that you need to worry.

What are those floaty things in your eye Michael Mauser

Have you ever noticed something swimmingin your field of visioné It may look like a tiny wormor a transparent blob, and whenever you try to geta closer look, it disappears, only to reappearas soon as you shift your glance. But don't go rinsing out your eyes! What you are seeing is a common phenomenon known as a floater. The scientific name for these objectsis Muscae volitantes,

Latin for quot;flying flies,quot; and true to their name,they can be somewhat annoying. But they're not actually bugsor any kind of external objects at all. Rather, they exist inside your eyeball. Floaters may seem to be alive,since they move and change shape, but they are not alive. Floaters are tiny objectsthat cast shadows on the retina, the lightsensitive tissueat the back of your eye.

They might be bits of tissue, red blood cells, or clumps of protein. And because they're suspendedwithin the vitreous humor, the gellike liquidthat fills the inside of your eye, floaters drift alongwith your eye movements, and seem to bounce a littlewhen your eye stops. Floaters may be onlybarely distinguishable most of the time.

They become more visiblethe closer they are to the retina, just as holding your hand closerto a table with an overhead light will result in a moresharply defined shadow. And floaters are particularly noticeable when you are lookingat a uniform bright surface, like a blank computer screen, snow, or a clear sky,

where the consistency of the backgroundmakes them easier to distinguish. The brighter the light is,the more your pupil contracts. This has an effect similarto replacing a large diffuse light fixture with a single overhead light bulb, which also makesthe shadow appear clearer. There is another visual phenomenonthat looks similar to floaters but is in fact unrelated. If you've seen tiny dots of lightdarting about

when looking at a bright blue sky, you've experienced what is knownas the blue field entoptic phenomenon. In some ways,this is the opposite of seeing floaters. Here, you are not seeing shadows but little moving windowsletting light through to your retina. The windows are actually causedby white blood cells moving through the capillariesalong your retina's surface. These leukocytes can be so largethat they nearly fill a capillary

Leave a Reply